Fish · Ocean of Discovery

Flying Fish – Exocoetidae

Flying fishes can be recognised by their huge pectoral fins. They can be loosely divided into two types. The four-wing flying fishes have both the pectoral and pelvic fins enlarged. The streamlined torpedo shape helps flying fish generate enough speed to break the water’s surface, and large, wing-like pectoral fins help get them airborne.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Flying fish can be seen jumping out of warm ocean waters worldwide. Flying fish are thought to have evolved this remarkable gliding ability to escape predators, of which they have many. Their pursuers include mackerel, tuna, swordfish, marlin, and other larger fish. For their sustenance, flying fish feed on a variety of foods, including plankton.

There are about 40 known species of flying fish. Beyond their useful pectoral fins, all have unevenly forked tails, with the lower lobe longer than the upper lobe. Many species have enlarged pelvic fins as well and are known as four-winged flying fish.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The process of taking flight, or gliding, begins by gaining great velocity underwater, about 37 miles (60 kilometers) per hour. Angling upward, the four-winged flying fish breaks the surface and begins to taxi by rapidly beating its tail while it is still beneath the surface. It then takes to the air, sometimes reaching heights over 4 feet (1.2 meters) and gliding long distances, up to 655 feet (200 meters). Once it nears the surface again, it can flap its tail and taxi without fully returning to the water. Capable of continuing its flight in such a manner, flying fish have been recorded stretching out their flights with consecutive glides spanning distances up to 1,312 feet (400 meters).

Flying fish are attracted to light, like a number of sea creatures, and fishermen take advantage of this with substantial results. Canoes, filled with enough water to sustain fish, but not enough to allow them to propel themselves out, are affixed with a luring light at night to capture flying fish by the dozens. There is currently no protection status on these animals.

 

Cuti-Cuti Malaysia · Ocean of Discovery · Sea Creature

Aquaria KLCC

 

The Aquaria KLCC

 

 

 

 

 

 

is an underwater park located beneath Kuala Lumpur Convention Centre within Kuala Lumpur City Centre development precinct.

 

 

 

 

 

 

This “ ocean of discovery ” is unveiled at the Aquaria KLCC right in the heart of the city. It is the first commercial aquarium in the Federal capital and a wonderful place to spend the school holidays with the family.

It’s a RM60 million aquarium featuring some 5,000 aquatic and marine animal exhibits of over 150 different species from Malaysia and around the world – some caught, some sourced and some given. Boasting of an area spanning two levels and covering over 5,500 sq m, making it the largest in the world, the Aquaria has 19 tanks with various environments to keep and display fishes from various parts of the world.

Attractions to the Aquaria KLCC are the journey of water where you can find Sand Tiger Shark, Giant Blotched Fantail Ray, Arapaima, Luna & Loco, Red-bellied Piranha, Tawny Nurse Shark, Green Turtle, Giant Grouper, Moon Jelly, Coatimundi, Water Rat  and many more.

 

 

 

 

The aquarium is also home to monkey-eating catfish from Endau Rompin, sharks from Singapore and the endangered fresh water tortoise called “ Chitra-chitra ” which were saved from the cooking pot.

A lot of visitors come here to learn more about the marine life and see what we have to offer, the feeding times are extremely popular with the crowd. Sometimes, there are divers get into the tanks to feed the fishes and marine life, and visitors crowding around the tanks during that times.

 

 

 

 

Rocky The Shark – If you are lucky, you might catch them  strolling along at Aquaria KLCC during special occasions. Don’t forget to grab your camera as they strike a pose for you!